Peacock Jumping Spider

Arthropod Nerds Unite!

a place for all things creepy-crawly

Emperor
Blue
puddleshark
Emperor & Lily
Female Emperor dragonfly (Anax imperator), laying eggs in a lily pond.

Speckled Bush-cricket
Blue
puddleshark
Leptophyes punctatissima

Leptophyes punctatissima. "Song: very faint ticks every 3-5 seconds; with a bat detector set to 40kHz these are heard as very loud click..." https://www.orthoptera.org.uk/sites/default/files/pdf/Common%20Bush-crickets%20and%20Grasshoppers.pdf

Interesting change in anthill
James.again
adafrog
I have had this fire ant colony near my barn for years, and it's always stayed the same. But a few days ago I noticed that the middle part had sunk. Very odd.


Skippers
Blue
puddleshark
Lots of Skippers on the wing here at present:

Large Skipper
Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus). A common species, widespread on both heathland and grassland. Cock’s-foot grass (Dactylis glomerata) is the principal caterpillar foodplant.

+4Collapse )

Lestes sponsa
Blue
puddleshark
Emerald Damselfly

Cinnabar Moth
Blue
puddleshark
Cinnabar Moth

Tyria jacobaeae. Both caterpillars and moths are distinctively marked to advise predators that they are unpalatable. Caterpillars feed on Ragwort (Senecio) and ingest toxins and bitter tasting alkaloids from the foodplant.

Hoverfly on Hogweed
Blue
puddleshark
Syrphus on Hogweed
Syrphus on Heracleum sphondylium.

Bombus pratorum
Blue
puddleshark
I met a small golden bee visiting Hawkbit flowers on the chalk downs:

Early Bumblebee
Bombus pratorum, the Early Bumblebee.

Volucella bombylans
Blue
puddleshark
Volucella bombylans
Volucella bombylans, a harmless hoverfly doing a fair impersonation of a White-tailed Bumblebee.


This species occurs in several forms, each of which mimics a species of bumblebee (Batesian mimicry). The two main varieties are Volucella bombylans var. bombylans, showing an orange-red tail, mimicking the Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) and Volucella bombylans var. plumata with a white tail, mimicking the White-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lucorum) and the Buff-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris).

The adults feed on nectar or pollen... The females of these hoverflies lay their eggs in the nests of social wasps or bumblebees, where the larvae live as scavengers, feeding on debris and occasionally on host's larvae.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volucella_bombylans

Scorpion Fly
Blue
puddleshark
Scorpion fly
Panorpa communis. Badbury Rings, Dorset.


"The scorpion fly is a strange looking insect which is found in gardens, hedgerows and woodland edges, particularly amongst nettles and Bramble. It has a long beak-like projection from its head that is uses to feed, scavenging on dead insects and frequently stealing the contents of spider's webs. It lives up to its name by sporting a scorpion-like tail, which the male uses in courtship displays. Adults usually mate at night, but mating can be a dangerous game for the male, who might easily be killed by the female. So he presents her with a nuptial gift of a dead insect or a mass of saliva to placate her..." www.wildlifetrusts.org/species/scorpion-fly

?

Log in